Glossary

Welcome to the glossary.

Caipirinha

How to make a Caipirinha

With a history said to date back to São Paulo 1918 this Brazilian national cocktail was barely known beyond the confines of its country until recent times. However, it’s come to the fore thanks to its simple combination of a few, delicious ingredients. Mix together either cachaça, or the rich, full flavour of Captain Morgan Original Spiced Gold, along with zingy lime and sugar. And conjure up images of tropical getaways and the pure spirit of celebration.

Watch how to make a Caipirinha here (ingredients and measures may vary)

Canadian Whisky

A whisky made from water, yeast, corn, rye and barley grains. Canadian whisky is distilled in accordance with the regulations governing the production of whisky in Canada.

Cask

A wooden barrel usually made of oak that is used for ageing premium darker spirits, such as whisky, brandy and some rums and tequila. They tend to be previously used for sherry and bourbon prior to ageing another spirit. Casks can be charred inside for added flavour in the spirit.

Champagne

A sparkling wine made in the Champagne region of north eastern France. Champagne is made primarily from pinot noir and chardonnay grapes.

Champagne flute

A tall, narrow wine glass, with a thin stem and tulip-like receptacle.

Club Soda

Also known as sparkling, or carbonated water.

Cobbler

Wine or spirit-based drinks made with sugar and water over shaved ice and garnished with fruit. Some, like the Whisky Cobbler, are shaken with fruit.

Cobbler Shaker

A three-piece shaker with a metal cap and built-in strainer. After the ingredients have been added, the cap is secured. The Boston Shaker is used in many bars because pouring from a Cobbler Shaker tends to be slower.

Cocktail

A mixed drink, usually made from vodka, whiskey, rum, gin or tequila mixed with fruit juice or other mixers. Typically served cold, although there are some warm versions, namely the Hot Toddy.

Cocktail glass

Also known as a martini glass, the v-shape presents a large surface area for ease of consumption as well as appearance, and the thin stem allows the drink to stay cool whilst holding.

Cocktail Shaker

Used to blend ingredients that are difficult to combine, i.e. liqueurs, cream, fruit juices. Most commonly comes as a two-piece Boston Shaker, or three-piece Cobbler Shaker.

Coffee Liqueur

A sweet, coffee-flavoured liqueur.

Cognac

A type of brandy named after the French district of Cognac, where it is distilled and grapes for production are grown.

Collins

A sour served in a highball glass with carbonated water.

Collins glass

Tall, thin glass named after the Tom Collins cocktail.

Continuous still

A two-column still developed by Aenas Coffey in 1831, hence also known as the ‘Coffey’ still. It allows for a continuous process of distillation as opposed to one run in the Pot still, the method of distillation that preceded it. Hence it is also known as the ‘Continuous’ still.

Cooler

A drink made with ginger ale, carbonated water or another carbonated product, garnished with lemon or orange peel and served in a Collins glass.

Cordial

A drink with a fruit base usually sold in concentrated form and diluted with water before drinking.

Crème de Cacao

Liqueur made from cocoa beans and bottled in two styles, dark and clear.

Crème de Cassis

A liqueur made from blackcurrant.

Crème de Menthe

Mint-flavoured liqueur made in two colours, green and clear (white). The green is traditionally served over crushed ice, and the white, or clear version is an ingredient in classics like the Grasshopper.

Cracked ice

Halfway between cubed ice and crushed ice. This is used when a medium amount of dilution is required in a drink.

Crème de Cacao

Liqueur made from cocoa beans and bottled in two styles, dark and clear.

Crème de Cassis

A liqueur made from blackcurrant.

Crème de Menthe

Mint-flavoured liqueur made in two colours, green and clear (white). The green is traditionally served over crushed ice, and the white, or clear version is an ingredient in classics like the Grasshopper.

Crushed ice

Pieces of ice smaller in size than cubed ice and often producing a slushy effect when mixed with liquid, as in the Daiquiri.

How to make crushed ice
Place ice cubes in a tea towel or in a bag on a chopping board and hit them with the side of a rolling pin. Keep going until you have small lumps – or place in a blender to reduce in size further. Then spoon carefully into your glass. Crushed ice is perfect in sweeter drinks and is classically used for the Daiquiri. Another method is to use a kitchen blender from the off, but whole ice cubes are tough and can easily wear down the blades and motor.

Watch our video here to find out more about making crushed ice

Cuba Libre

How to make a Cuba Libre

Simple, delicious and so much more than just a rum and cola, the Cuba Libre probably dates back to 1900, when Cuban bartenders would have experimented with recipes containing a new-fangled drink to hit its shores, called cola. With its rich, mellow flavour, Captain Morgan Original Spiced Gold makes a great Cuba Libre. The fresh lime juice is essential for cutting through the sweetness of the cola, bringing out the flavours of the delicious base rum.

And here’s how to make a Cuba Libre (ingredients and measures may vary).

Cups

Wine-based drinks flavoured with liqueurs, spirits, fruits, spices and herbs, topped with tonic water and served with ice.

Curaçao

A liqueur flavoured with the dried peel of laraha citrus fruit – a plant similar to an orange – and grown on the island of Curaçao, near the coast of Venezuela. Curaçao liqueur comes in white, orange and blue, with the colour being the only difference. Curaçao matches well with rum, lime and juices.

Curaçao

A liqueur flavoured with the dried peel of laraha citrus fruit – a plant similar to an orange – and grown on the island of Curaçao, near the coast of Venezuela. Curaçao liqueur comes in white, orange and blue, with the colour being the only difference. Curaçao matches well with rum, lime and juices.